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Book Review: Ink on Paper by Vishikha

Ink on Paper by Vishikha is an enchanting book that presents a gamut of poems and prose. Seems like the poetess has put in her life’s experience to run through the pages! The collection is prolifically superb – transcending all the conventional poetic rules, Vishikha started her poems with an aura of short stories and introductions. It is a unique way of leaving a liberating effect on the readers.


There is hardly any feel or aspect that looked ignored, otherwise the collection is here to stay longer and to make souls replete that have been drained off in the absence of juicy poetic literature. From memories, to breakups, to holocausts, to brotherhood and everything in between – the poems and prose stand tall to sooth and sway your mind and heart. Despite it being highly contemporary in style and themes, there are a couple of poems that talk about the brutality of WW-II, as in when Nazi was crushing innocent souls.

Like tides in the ocean, the collection wounds up and down with issues that grapple either heart or society at large. It’s not limited only to society and its allied themes; however, much has been expressed about life, love, lust, separation, infatuation, heartbreaks, self-belief, family, spirituality and so on. In total there are 82 short poems and prose followed by a short preface or story. The book reads like a landscape changing its colours so often, yet enthralling and soul-stirring.

Poems like ‘The Girl Walking to School’ and ‘Uninspired’ made us realize the value of life that we hold above millions. The message these poems relay are indeed of great significance, as being satisfied and humble is the need of the hour to the souls critical of everything. Isn’t life a beautiful journey at our own pace and in our own comfort zones?

The collection is filled with something or other that teaches and urges us to keep moving in life while being good and bold at heart. The poems about understanding people and their intentions are also high in providing fodder for thoughts. It’s a dazzling book and evident that the poetess has put in her total conviction and brilliance in bringing out this book so beautifully. One can read this book over and again and have that soothing comfort that one gets after being consoled by angelic powers.

The poetess is so young and profound at poetic skills that she effortlessly penned down a book that appeals for ‘change your life in style’ to its readers. Well-edited and beautifully composed, this is a highly effective book for all sorts of poem lovers. If she puts her work on Instagram, probably she could fetch millions of fans from there. Overall, an amazing performance!

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