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Book Review: The Smart Balance by Ankita Aurora

Change is a law of nature. Well, the question is, have we really changed for good in this digital era? We are living a different life today – it is not the same that was a few decades back. There is no charm left for basic and tiny things, seems like excitement and attention has dried up. But why? The reason behind all this is digital smart technology.


Smart phones, laptops, tabs, PCs and smart wearable, in fact a whole new world is here. A smart world – laced with smart technology. But, we, as humans, are becoming smart as well? The answers differ from one person to another. If you think your answer is a big Yes, well then you need to think it over. And this time you also need ‘The Smart Balance’ by Ankita Aurora, a non-fiction, part self-help, and part user guide.

For its essence and the issues it concerns, it’s a beautifully researched and written book. The book highlights that we are living 2.0. Yes, it’s not the same simple life which our ancestors lived or left the lineage of it. This new version of life is not so attractive from within, though its façade is impressive. As the author herself puts it like this in the very first chapter:

“Because many technological alternatives exist to fill in for people; our social skills have decreased, giving way to isolation, depression, obesity, addiction, and insomnia. Never in the history of humanity have humans been this connected, yet so lonely.”

After reading this book, your perception about your lifestyle and interaction with the smart technology will change for the better of you. So far, almost entire human race have been reacting kind of ignorant. They probably are so happy with the tech advances that they have forgotten to consider the side and bad effects in the times to come. Well, there are effects like people have started living in the virtual world, they suffer distractions due to digital noises, pain in body parts have become common, social media and video games seem like have eternal feeds, the radiation from gadgets affect sleep and thinking pattern, and so on. A cycle of metabolism is changing for no good results, just because of unwanted indulgence in smart technology. Is it needed? This book offers an extensive coverage on smart technology with proper quotes, evidences, and short reports, and possibly with evident symptoms.

So, more or less, at one point of time this book sounds like a guide for living a better life. If read properly, notes made, one can avoid many pitfalls that can prove perilous for the overall growth of one’s mind and body. Not only the book talks about negatives, but also, it offers solutions, as to make a plan for getting rid of smart gadgets, how to detox, and above all how to balance it in everyday life. Knowledge is important and powerful – and this book serves exactly. Even if you search for lifestyle blogs online, you will never come across such a wonderfully complied work at one place. The book is like an eye-opener. There is a lot to understand and grab from it. Highly recommended! For grabbing more inputs from the author, you must visit her profile on social media handles or simply pay her a visit on her website (www.morfosis.in).

In final words, balancing life is an art, and not all know this art. So, here is your best chance with this book. Go for it – take time and read it with your own pace – you are sure to get a load of vital information for a better living in the digital world.

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