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Book Review: Silhouette and Other Poems by Tasnima Yasmin

Silhouette and Other Poems by Tasnima Yasmin is a short collection of poems, mainly featured around the contemporary themes of the modern world. The book has on offer 24 poems, capturing various topics about your lives’ humdrum existence and moments in cogitation.


The collection starts with Kaput – this poem brings out the brutality of the commerce world, as how is something captured and destroyed and then turned into a piece of merchandize to benefit a few. Probably, the poet tried conveying that we humans have been exploiting the mother earth for more than that we need. It’s time to stop all on the name of business. Next in the collection is ‘School Days’, a happy poem which inevitably reminisces golden days of many.

Whether the poems are about technology, relationship, or any random subject; a kind of tenderness is evident throughout. At every juncture, all the time, each poem tries delving deep into some strange sort of abyss. Yes, in many poems the themes run dark, but the screaming is loud enough to capture one’s mind and looks like requesting not to indulge into anything insane for the sake of peace and humanity. For instance, poems like Mayhem, Apocalypse, and Temporal Paradox have addressed the issues that are prevalent across the world – fake nationalism and war and destruction and hate and so on.

A shadow of personalities and their allied influences run in the poem ‘Weak Days’. This poem is poignant in bringing forward the hidden desires and ignorance we carry for others, in short how do we perceive others based on the external factors. This poem reinstates the trait of selfishness that eventually maneuvers our actions. The poem about Insomnia is brilliantly written about the restlessness. Well, how its shade differ from one to another in accordance to circumstance, is a catch worth chasing.

In fact poems about love and relationship and the kind of delicacy that exists there can be captured first hand through the poems presented in the middle part of the book. The Spastic Child shows that a mother’s love never dies for her child. Be it any age, her children are like ‘child prodigy’ to her forever.

It would be unfair to conclude the review without a glimpse of the poet’s brilliance, well, in the poem Nature, the following lines may nudge you for an ovation.

Don’t you see my fallen state?
I lie bleeding in this dark corner,
Bathed in abuses of all kinds,
Barely able to raise my voice,
I silently utter a prayer,
For you to turn back,
Better late than never,
Get me a remedy,
Heal my broken soul,
I, Mother Nature, await your return.

At times a poetry collection comes where picking out the best not only creates a dilemma but also pushes your limit for literary aesthetics. This is one such book. By involving various post-modern or contemporary themes, the poet made sure that you, as a reader, ought to go for some if not all, since a close look reveals a case of sub-audition that we bind to our dry lives in the concrete jungles. It’s not a heady mix, but yeah mild mix.

The book is short and one can read it really fast i.e. two readings can be done in, like, a couple of hours. However, to get into the skin of their meaning requires a serious thought process and time where you feel like being paused. As it’s given before the book that best of our moments from memories are brought alive when we are in the pause mood – it gives the ability to cogitate, rethink, and an urge pulsates to put the things aright.

At times the vocabulary jumble interrupts the flow, but overall it’s a nice read with wonderful meaning emanating from each poem.

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