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Ruskin Bond Poem: Look for the Colours of Life

Just like his stories and novels, Ruskin’s poems, too, are simple and engrossing. As we all know that Ruskin Bond epitomizes children’s books in India, and we have been reading his stories since early days. Well, did you ever try reading poems and verses written by him? Probably no, because publishing houses take no interest in publishing poem books. For them publishing is a business, well our hero Ruskin writes poem for fun and children.


We have brought forward some of his best poems – they are for all ages, alike. This poem in particular appeals most to the malleable heart of children, as they are new in life and everything, it is must to make them realize that life around them is beautiful and they can contribute towards keeping this planet beautiful by preserving nature and its allied species.

Colours are everywhere,
Bright blue the sky,
Dark green the forest,
And light the fresh grass;
Bright yellow the lights
From a train sweeping past,
The flame tree glow
At this time of year,
The mangoes burn bright
As the monsoon draws near.

A favourite colour of mine
Is the pink of the candy-floss man
As he comes down the dusty road,
Calling his wares;
And the balloon-man soon follows,
Selling his floating bright colours.

It’s early summer
And the roses blush
In the dew-drenched dawn,
And poppies sway red and white
In the invisible breeze.

Only the wind has no colour;
But if you look carefully
You will see it teasing
The colour out of the leaves.
And the rain has no colour
But it turns the bronzed grass
To emerald green,
And gives a golden sheen
To the drenched sunflower.
Look for the colours of life –
They are everywhere,
Even in your dreams.

By Ruskin Bond

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